Recent paintings by Elin Pendleton. AAEA
Horse Paintings by Elin Pendleton
Animal paintings by Elin Pendleton, AAEA
Figurative paintings by Elin Pendleton, AAEA
Still life paintings by Elin Pendleton,AAEA
Landscape paintings by Elin Pendleton, AAAEA
One Painting Each Day
Elin Pendleton's Painting Instructional Videos
Elin Pendleton's Instrucitonal Books on Painting
Thoughts for Students
for Collectors
About the Elin Pendleton, Artist

Search Elin's Site
(opens a new page)

Verified Seller

The Daily Paintings
Archives:

2010
january
February
march
April
May
June

2009
january
February
march
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

2008
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

2007
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

2006
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

2005
Most are now on iTunes, with expanded audio commentary.(Opens new page)
Oct
Nov
Dec

Updated 3/29/12

The Daily Paintings and Postcard-Sized Sketches in Oils and Acrylics

Subscribe to Elin's "Daily Paintings" and receive every beautiful painting or lesson in your email through Googlegroups.

Click HERE to Subscribe

To the Archives (keeps you on the same page)

Prices as noted, many are available through Elin's ebay store.

November 2007



1 It has been a long time for this painting, and not my usual time frame, but this one is now 95% finished, and I've sent out this image to the collectors for their comments and (hopefully) approval of what is done so far. I'm pleased with it!

It is an oil, 30 x 50 inches, and has kept my studio out of order while I painted it on the wall. My Hughes easel has been in the middle of the room, and it pouts there while I walk over to the wall to paint. It is good to be able to see the finish on this one and to share with you the plein air paintings tomorrow and this week that have been waiting for this commission to finish!

Now with the new construction on the outer studio, with a new eight-foot tall sliding door letting in north light, I'm so excited about the upcoming workshops here! The February one is full, but there's a new one in March that still has space.

Podcasts of many of the daily paintings are now available on iTunes and YouTube! Just put in my name for a search.
2

Here's one of the acrylic paintings I did as part of the Centennial Celebration of the University of Redlands. They had almost 100 plein air artists painting around the campus for a week--unfortunately during the wildfires when the smoke was so bad that we had advisories to "stay indoors". I took that to heart and went to the Hall of Letters to one of the most unique "classrooms" on the campus. Lined with bookshelves, it also has two stained glass windows that were installed in the 1950s, which depict a knight and a prioress. Home of senior seminars, and many a student presentation, HL213 is now forever captured on canvas. It is a 12 x 16 acrylic on board, and when the Dean whose office is in that building saw it--she bought it!

It also won an award at the opening reception, judged by John Budicin, past president of the Plein Air Painters of America. Nice to know that there is some flexibility in what we paint "outdoors". And I was able to save my lungs for another day's painting later in the week.

Here's a photograph of the painting, on the wall at the showing of all the artist's paintings, complete with ribbon. I had two of them, both sold, and both in this image. Can you guess which is my "other" painting?

The word is back on the Three Dogs painting: "Elin,it is beautiful!!! We are so excited about it and can't wait to hang it in our living room..I especially love the way the yellow lab looks. I think she stands out because she is looking at the viewer. I didn't think about that aspect when we were planning the portrait. All three of them look simply divine! Well done Elin!!"

3 Original acrylic, 8 x 5 inches, on board. One of the nice things about painting on location is the freedom one has to interpret what is "out there" and make a decent expression of the mood, the effects of light, and to add one's personal statement.

"There I was, painting on location, with about a dozen others in the same area...." Each one of us painting a familiar scene, yet uniquely our own end result. Me, on a sunny afternoon, decided to change what was in front of me to a moonlight scene. With the Color System, all I did was close the lids on four of the pigments, and paint away, keeping my values fairly close to one another, and focusing on the focal point's facade to convey night time.

Here's the actual view during the day, to give you an idea of how much freedom I expressed in changing the time of day and the composition.

Being able to move away from "what's out there" to my own artistic expression is the most freeing thing for me as an artist. No longer constrained to the limits of photography, or on location sites, I can begin to exercise my unique vision in pigment. What does it take? Miles of canvas, a willingness to make mistakes for the purpose of learning, and belief in one's ability to have a fresh vision on ordinary subjects. And miles of canvas. Did I already say miles of canvas? Oh, senior moment! Miles of canvas. Paint. Paint more. And then paint more. No shortcuts in this business, sorry!

14

Last night I was the guest demonstrator for the Corona Art Association, in the town just west of where I live. A very nice group of artists came out for the evening, and many I hadn't seen in a while (Mary!). I painted this 16 x 12 acrylic during the demonstration, starting with a toned canvas panel on my new Easyl.

I used a burnt orange color to get rid of that white surface, choosing a warm color to offset the dominant cool colors to come. The design was drawn without reference from memories of snow scenes I've seen in the past. Although I didn't take "in process" steps as a lesson series for you, I will do my best to explain how it came to this point.

First, I used the cool pill box colors entirely for 98% of the image. I laid in the large darks where the pines and spruce trees were to go, and also using that mix of burnt umber and ultramarine blue, the water area.

Then the rest of the canvas was covered with varying shades of the three ever-useful sky colors: Ultramarine blue, alizarin crimson and yellow ochre, lightened with titanium.

Controlling the opacity of the mixes was important, so that underpainting shows through as the layers became lighter. I wanted that translucency of frozen water to convince the viewer of the layers of snow.
After the break (the Corona Art Association is to be commended for the great hospitality--I didn't need dinner!) I came back and "finally" opened the warm box, where I used cadmium orange tinting the titanium white for the final sunny areas. Holding off the accent areas until the final colors are put in helps keep the rest of the painting interesting. Then those highlights become the "plink" to finish it off.

Many artists put too much importance too soon on that "plink". Far better to have a really good painting, and then add that "plink".

On the home front, we came back from Chicago with "Onslow!" Puppy breath and happy wiggles... Here he is with our old German Pinscher. He's about 6" tall. She's 16".

25

During the fires last month, when the air quality in Southern California was "Hazardous", artists were painting "en plein aire" on the grounds of the University of Redlands as part of their centennial celebration. On one of those afternoons, I went inside the chapel, to get a view of the light and space from the balcony. Sitting up there, I listened to first a flutist, and secondly an organist, come in and play to an empty house. The acoustics of the building are spectacular; listening to the chords and tone of the Casavant Opus 1230 organ rising to the rafters lifted my spirits as well as my brushes! This is an 18 x 24 inch acrylic on board that showcases the stained glass, the stage area and the organ on the left. Both the grand and baby grand pianos were on the platform as well.
I used mostly my earth colors (burnt umber, yellow ochre, and burnt sienna) to facilitate the unity of the interior, then pulled out all the stops to create the luminescent windows above. The contrast of those pure colors against the muted earths inevitably pulls the viewer to the beauty and glow of the stained glass.