Recent paintings by Elin Pendleton. AAEA
Horse Paintings by Elin Pendleton
Animal paintings by Elin Pendleton, AAEA
Figurative paintings by Elin Pendleton, AAEA
Still life paintings by Elin Pendleton,AAEA
Landscape paintings by Elin Pendleton, AAAEA
One Painting Each Day
Elin Pendleton's Painting Instructional Videos
Elin Pendleton's Instrucitonal Books on Painting
Thoughts for Students
for Collectors
About the Elin Pendleton, Artist

Search Elin's Site
(opens a new page)

Verified Seller

The Daily Paintings
Archives:

2010
january
February
march
April
May
June

2009
january
February
march
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

2008
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

2007
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

2006
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

2005
Most are now on iTunes, with expanded audio commentary.(Opens new page)
Oct
Nov
Dec

Updated 3/29/12

The Daily Paintings and Postcard-Sized Sketches in Oils and Acrylics

Subscribe to Elin's "Daily Paintings" and receive every beautiful painting or lesson in your email through Googlegroups.

Click HERE to Subscribe

To the Archives (keeps you on the same page)

Prices as noted, many are available through Elin's ebay store.

May 2008



11

Here's an acrylic demonstration piece I did, 9 x 12 inches showing a cow in evening light. A quick study with lots of loose brushwork, this was done in the first Color Boot Camp last week.

I've been enjoying my stay in Georgia for the past ten days, and have begun the second Color Boot Camp for "repeat offenders"--another group of folks with a passion for getting color right, right from the start, using the Color System. I've done some demonstration paintings, and will share them with you here.

Georgia is full of gorgeous scenery, not the least of which is the Amicalola River in the Dawson County Forest. This is not far from where we are holding the workshop--and I'm holding Sparky as he looks at the enticing water movement! Bringing him along on the plane trip and having him as my shadow/companion has been a pure joy. Many painting subjects abound in the area, and I can hardly keep my brushes still! I've done eight paintings so far, and in the morning I'm taking the class down to this river again for an on-location lesson at 7 a.m.

14

I do have a wonderful bit of image to share with you--one of last week's Boot Campers stopped by to say "hi" and meet the repeat offenders this week, and she shared with us the work "before Color Boot Camp, and after". The still life on the left is before. I'm so pleased to see such growth in a student's work in such a short time! She really was ready for Color Boot Camp!

Now, for my demonstration of moonlight for the boot camp attendees, I painted this 8 x 10 oil of round bales of hay in moonlight in oil. I hope you'll enjoy it! I have many more, including a lesson painting in acrylics for morning light on the Amicalola River from yesterday. Thanks for reading!

20 Back in California again, and after a couple of days of untangling knots and watering, petting the critters who didn't get to go along, I'm ready to bring out the work that was done in the workshops in Georgia last week and earlier.

As a demonstration of both back light and morning light, I painted this 12 x 9 oil in a 40 minute demonstration to share how the Color System works to depict these attributes in a canvas that's both flat and without luminosity.

It's hard to compete with Nature, when Nature brings us such beauty! While on Fay's workshop farm, several of us would go out at 7 a.m. and walk the fields and woods, bringing back beautiful source material such as the image below. Those morning walks set the stage for the long hours to follow, filling our eyes with beauty and brightness we would later transfer to canvas.

Having such a gorgeous area for a workshop is one of the reasons I'm so grateful to Fay for opening her heart and farm to the "Boot Campers", many of whom actually staying on the farm for the duration. They would paint well into the night--working hard to settle in the guidelines of the Color System before their five short days were over.

This painting is in the hands of new collector Beth Haislip from South Carolina.

21

The soft evening light of Georgia plays across one of the many flower beds on Fay's farm becoming the subject of this plein air 7 x 5 acrylic. Using the layering that makes acrylic painting so wonderful allowed me to set up and complete this work with no additional touch-ups later in the workshop.

First placing the large dark shapes of shadows and deep shrub coloration, it was an easy matter to add additional layers, keeping the values close until the final accents were added in the iris blooms and sunlit rock wall.

I used filbert brushes to paint the entire subject. Those brushes allow such flexibility in marks to make the trunks, the broad brushwork on the foreground, and the calligraphic marks of the fence posts. They are Ruby Satins by Silver Brushes, and I really do love them!

This painting is already in the collection of Sam Gullo of Cleveland, Ohio.

Here's another view of the lovely area of the North Georgia Mountains... beautiful! Right before haying season, the fields are lush with new growth. That's one of the farm's hay storage sheds in the distance.

24

How important is the surface on which you paint? Does it have to start out white? I think the surface preparation is very important--equivalent to a foundation on a house. The energy conveyed in the earliest brush marks target the forms that will come later. This canvas was started on location at the Amicalola River a week or so ago, while I was teaching the workshop at Fay's farm near Dawsonville, and I painted it in one standing (vs. "sitting", which I don't do much). It is a 12 x 9 acrylic, and this first pass puts down the masses of the abstract structure of the painting. I'll add many layers of paint to bring it to a finish, coming in three lessons (I think--forgot how many pictures I took!) I'm quite pleased with the painting, sitting right by my computer here. There is a great deal of energy in it. Those brush marks from the get-go have that same energy!

Here is the source material--morning light on the river, with spring leaves on the forest trees. North Georgia is surely beautiful!

28

Here's the next step in the painting on location of the rocks in the Amicalola River in Dawson National Forest. In the upper tree area, I am scumbling the paint onto the dry layers to give me reference for the details that follow. I like to make large shapes and then drive them down into the smaller shapes when I use acrylics.

The energy of the brushwork is still quite alive and well at this stage. I have not done any glazing yet. Glazing (using paint thinned with medium) will bind and unify the composition, and also tie together areas of the painting that might not be unified without it.

Notice how my brushwork direction makes pathways for your eyes to follow. Mark-making is how we as artists give the viewer much more than a source photograph.

Congratulations to new collector Fran Carson of Grand Island, Nebraska on her purchase of "The Kind Eye" (Clydesdale).

29

Here is where some of the subtle magic starts! With the additional layers of acrylic brushwork, the painting starts to get a feeling of three dimensions, much like the way we actually focus our eyes when looking at nature.

The layers of brush work over the water area are now horizontal, indicating the flow of the surface. You'll remember that first I laid down the vertical strokes to indicate the reflections on the smooth surface--now I put in the actual movement of that water with the horizontals.

Still no details... Remember, the painting has to be interesting at every stage (except for the "Uglies" when a painting has a large focal point awaiting an appearance!). This painting never had an "Uglies" stage, because there is no really strong focal point to create confusion.

On other news, I've decided to not do the June workshop here at my studio--I'm finding I need some more time to adjust to schedules and demands... I am working on a painting of a recently departed aikidoist and friend, as a gift for my teacher. I am also working on TWO panels for the Mural Mosaic project, in Canada. You can view the panels that have already been submitted for the Horse mural by visiting their site. It is fun and I'll post the project as it unfolds. I'm working on General Lee's horse Traveler as my subject. I visited his grave in Virginia a couple years ago, and really liked that horse.

And then there's the 24 x 36 waiting to be started!!

31 How fun to put the finishing details on a canvas that already is moving well! At this point in the painting project, I'm using my brush to bring your eye where I want it to go--having decided that the high contrast point where the big rock slips into the water is the most important place. The sharpest edge is there, the shapes of sun and shadow are repetitive (think light and dark side) and if you'll squint at the composition, you'll see that the highest contrast is at that point. Everything else is subordinate to that place--which also happens to be close to the "Rule of Thirds" (intersection of lines dividing the canvas into thirds horizontally and vertically).

The richness of the acrylics layered one upon another without negating the under layers is one of the reasons I love the medium. Just like the forest itself, made up of thousands of different layers of leaves, sunshine and shadow.

Perhaps you already see the tension created by the lack of vertical and truly horizontal lines in the composition? I wanted the illusion of time passing, and leaning diagonals create the feeling of movement through space and time, unlike strict verticals. Even the "flat" water doesn't have any true horizontals!

Congratulations to collector Debbie Sullivan on her purchase of the acrylic "Playing Catch" (didn't have that title back in Georgia!) depicted below.