Recent paintings by Elin Pendleton. AAEA
Horse Paintings by Elin Pendleton
Animal paintings by Elin Pendleton, AAEA
Figurative paintings by Elin Pendleton, AAEA
Still life paintings by Elin Pendleton,AAEA
Landscape paintings by Elin Pendleton, AAAEA
One Painting Each Day
Elin Pendleton's Painting Instructional Videos
Elin Pendleton's Instrucitonal Books on Painting
Thoughts for Students
for Collectors
About the Elin Pendleton, Artist

Search Elin's Site
(opens a new page)

Verified Seller

The Daily Paintings
Archives:

2010
january
February
march
April
May
June

2009
january
February
march
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

2008
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

2007
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

2006
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

2005
Most are now on iTunes, with expanded audio commentary.(Opens new page)
Oct
Nov
Dec

Updated 12/3/09

The Daily Paintings and Postcard-Sized Sketches in Oils and Acrylics

Subscribe to Elin's "Daily Paintings" and receive every beautiful painting or lesson in your email through Googlegroups.

Click HERE to Subscribe

To the Archives to see the paintings by month and year

Prices as noted if available.

RSS Feeds available through Google Reader or other subscription service.

September 2009

1 HAPPY NEW YEAR!!! Holiday Lights and the third painting of the Mission Inn done on location. Fun to paint the landmarks and capture the "feel" of the night. This is the Mission Inn Skybridge that has a totally different look in daytime. You can follow this link to see another view of it during the daytime.

This was done with the interactive acrylics - Golden Open acrylics - which I am learning to enjoy. Only 6 x 8 inches, it was done quickly and loosely. These paints handle like oils, yet dry to the touch usually one day later. I was positioned on the lawn near the parking structure and had many, many folks stop by and comment--more so than in front of the Inn. Go figure. Sparky was with me and again let me know when folks would approach. Good dog!

This new year will bring many challenges, several workshops, and exciting artwork and lessons coming your way. I hope you'll continue to stay with me, and please share these with your friends!
2 The aikido painting continues, and now I know that there will be six seated figures with my husband third from the left.

Symbolism abounds here, as our teacher Ace Atkinson is overlapped by the founder of aikido. Rowdy is painted against a lighter, more ethereal wall, and our current aikido friends flank us on either side (that's going to be me second from left).

Now that I've solved the issues with who's where, I can come back and paint in the mats, and detail out the rest of it. Note that I put the Japanese socks on O Sensei (the older man in the foreground), and I had to photograph Alberto's foot to get that part right. Fun how references are needed and found as they occur.
7 I finished my husband's painting, and here is the end result--a 30 x 40 oil. Yes, I'm in it now--second from left--but you'll have to go to his office to see me up close!
8 Lesson painting time!
I'm starting one of three paintings for the Art Show at the Dog Show with entries due in their hands on the 14th of this month....talk about cutting it close!
Modus operandi, but I think you'll enjoy the stages of this fanciful and spiritual painting. I have always loved the idea of guardian dogs--we have the two Tibetan Mastiffs who guard us and the livestock, and both my husband and I have owned Doberman Pinschers in our past. Since I love the grace and royal demeanor of these dogs, it seems natural to do a painting for this show with that theme in mind.

Here's the first "go-pass" on this 18 x 18 inch acrylic, and the design comes out strongly right away. I'm looking at it over my shoulder, and the strength of the circular movement of the angel wings on the dog and the lifted, protective paw on the sleeping child already form a strong, connected design. Destined to be entitled "Guardian", just starting this painting made me feel sheltered. Even with these thin layers of dark acrylic, the viewer can see the structure of the dog. It will be corrected and detailed as I build the upcoming layers.
9 The Doberman "Guardian" with the canvas almost 80% covered with the major colors and values that will be there--except for the larger light that I'll put in later. I really like it at this stage, as I can see that I'm keeping the spirit and strength of the dog as I define and edit the large masses. What needs editing is the feeling of danger--even though the dog has wings and is in the role of protector, right now the feedback I get is one of doubt whether the dog means good or evil. That will change as it is developed.

At this point the canvas is COMPLETLY in the cool box--no warms at all except for the underpainting of Quin Burnt Orange and Cadmium Orange. Fun colors to start with, as it really sets off the cools!
10 The Doberman "Guardian" is at the stage where I start to put glazes and additional layers on these first fill-ins to develop and set the light, shadows and design.

It's coming along now,and I could list the bazillion areas I'm going to change, but it still needs many more layers of acrylic paint to really put the "punch" in the lighting. Since I know what needs changing, I won't bore you with that long list, but will get after it to finish it up. That deadline of Monday approaches for the Art Show at the Dog Show (Kansas City)!

In handling this painting, there are two images that are being used as references for it--one of a Doberman that has long since gone to the Rainbow Bridge, and a sleeping child from an old magazine (black and white). The wings are from my chickens who don't approve of modeling, but that's how I get their structure--even tho' fanciful. Now who would think "chicken wings" when guardian angels come to mind? Having the flock out back has been a boon to bird paintings. Hmmm, can they be tax deductible as models? Ha!
11 "Guardian" is finished now, and I'm quite pleased with the final image. Why I didn't make the wings black and tan as well? I thought about it (knowing that if this were a real creature, they most likely would be), and then decided that with the amount of bounce light coming and going on the dog and child, the white wings would enhance that, which I really wanted. So white they stayed, even tho' I deepened the shadow sides with the "sky trio" (you Color Boot Camp graduates know which ones!)

Paintings get to me sometimes, and "Guardian" does that. I have a hard time explaining it. In a feeble attempt, I'll say that, to me, it embodies the response of being loved, cared for and safely watched over. I may continue with this concept and express it visually in different ways in upcoming works.

Tomorrow the image goes off to the Art Show at the Dog Show (opens a new window), and who knows whether the judge will accept it? Will he/she have the need for the safety this painting conveys? Some people might think it is too sci-fi. Not me. Now, if it doesn't get accepted, I do not take it personally, nor think less of the work. Sometimes paintings don't fit with the wholeness of a show, or they've already juried in enough of that type. I'm at a point in my career where I paint for me, and if that doesn't please a judge, that's their loss. My work now touches enough people that one or two judges can't dent my belief in what I do.

So why enter juried shows? I find that when there is a gathering of specific people interested in a specific type of art, it is in my best interest to be a part of that. ASaDS is a show where the gathering of dog people validates my entry fee, the shipping and time involved. (This painting sold during the show!)
12 The second painting for the Art Show at the Dog Show comes to you with this 9 x 12 board on which I have painted some semi-transparent acrylic layers. The scene is a dock on a river, and there will be a girl and a dog fishing from it. In doing this painting, I want to have the scenery be a strong supporting player, so I've put the focal points up and away from the mid-point of the canvas (they aren't even sketched in at this point).
I'm using traditional acrylics for fast drying time and quickness of application. These quasi-translucent layers are painted over that burnt orange under painting, and are always with the cool box colors. We're off and running with another one!

13 This 9 x 12 acrylic is further along than I planned, but I got so captivated by the water and light, I just couldn't stop to take a photo earlier. The girl is even being blocked in, and the wire fox terrier even has 3-D form. Dang!

This will be called "Incoming" with the humor in whether the girl will be reeling in something or the dog will be going into the water after it--or both!

Interesting to note that I don't even sketch in the figure with pencil before painting directly on the background layers. I just pick a middle value hue that's close to what I need and put a "cutout" shape to localize the object. Then I paint over that to create the illusion of three-dimensional form. The dog went in as a white silhouette first, then warmed and cooled depending upon light sides or shadow sides.

I love acrylics for the ability to create layers--this is SO effective on water. I love oils, too, but hands down acrylics have it for creating the illusion of depth and transparency. I keep adding layers to the sky as well, continuing to go lighter with each application.
14 Here's the finished painting, dog and girl in bright sunshine on the water, holding a pole and reeling in the red bobber. Compare this finished painting with yesterday's, and you'll see how I developed the three-dimensional forms with the additions of distinct layers on top of the underpainting. This is especially viewable in the distant trees.

On the design, look at the line that the distant water's edge creates. It is just above the girl's knees, showing that we are looking UP at her--and she is drawn with that in mind--her shoulders are in perspective with the nearer one higher than the opposite one. The dog is below the horizon line, and so we're looking DOWN on him. You can see this in action by laying a straight edge along the dock edge and also through her shoulders--the lines will intersect at the water line on the right side!

I really like the painting, because that kid could be me at about age nine, however the dog would have been a dachshund instead of the wire hair terrier. (And my hair never looked that good!) In using the Color System on human skin, I flip the boxes, and paint the shadows warm and the lights cool--thus she seems to glow with life because of the reversed contrasts of temperature. Come to one of my Color Boot Camps to see this in action! My goodness I have four in 2009, one's already filled.
15 This is the lesson painting for the 12 x 16 acrylic that is entered in the Art Show at the Dog Show. For the next three days, I'll be depicting a Welsh Springer Spaniel. Yet again I'm focusing on the landscape being a strong supporter of the dog in action, flushing a pheasant.

A rough sketch starts me out in acrylics, done over the burnt orange underpainting, choosing a warm because of the predominance of the Cool Box Colors as the painting progresses. I do a cover-the-canvas every time to get rid of the white. I see so many paintings with those itty bitty white spots showing through--very distracting to a trained eye. By getting rid of the white, I have a surface that unifies if/when any of that warm peeks through.

The dynamics of the design are already apparent if you see those vertical strokes supporting the action in the center--just like the curtains on a stage. I'll be using a modified familiar background from another, earlier painting to make this get off my brushes faster. I will be looking for that "aha" moment when you recognize it--and when I paint to deadlines, I don't try to break new ground (except for "Guardian"). One thing about this, I have painted so much, that the repertroire of materials available is vast. If you haven't painted much, every painting is a discovery and challenge. I remember those days!
16 Can you see the misty morning light? Yes, I'm using the same colors and general design of the earlier "Misty Morning Horses" painting to get this one done quickly for the Art Show at the Dog Show deadline. It's always faster when I don't have to solve complex problems anew. If you look over the total body of an artist's work, you'll see many versions of similar subjects. We build on prior levels.

I'm covering the canvas with the cools--over 85% and because of the warm underpainting, the color excitement is already in place. When I use that phrase "color excitement" I remember one Walter Foster book (#63) by Merlin Enabnit. Even though the paperback is long out of print, I was always amazed at how he could get the "Color Excitement" (his term) for the juxtaposition of various pigments. It was fun to see all the ads he did for the foundation garment and soap industry (1940s) when I googled his name. One can still find his Foster Books on ebay.

You know I prefer to have a good background in before painting the focal points. And that's what's happening with this one. Tomorrow, more layers of color in this acrylic, and the pheasant. Then the painting will go to the dog(s)!
17 I'm still working in the cool box as I paint the pheasant. One way I can convey action in a flat, two-dimensional surface is to lose the edges of anything that is moving--such as the wings of the bird. He doesn't look "stuck on" when we lose edges, but rather blends in well to the rest of the canvas. Why do we feel we need to outline every edge of whatever it is we paint? To do so means we're relying too heavily on source material--generally photographs--and the action captured without the illusion of movement creates a static, flat image. So I spend a lot of time deciding which edges need to be lost to create that feeling of life and movement in my subjects.

I still have a ton of work to do on the background, but the initial values are in place now. And of course you can see the position of the dog, now, too.

The value plan for this one is called a "keyhole" because of the circular pattern with the lights in a generally round shape near the middle of the canvas. As far as which one of the six value plans, it's destined to be a small light, large dark in midtones.
18 The Welsh Springer Spaniel is now in the painting, and I've spent the balance of my "brush time" with the trees and background. I've made those areas more visually interesting by texturizing the areas with similar hues and values.

This image doesn't show the lighter values on the tree trunks, and for that I'm disappointed. There's a lot going on in those darks, and to omit them does a disservice to the work. This 12 x 16 acrylic is called "Flush"