Recent paintings by Elin Pendleton. AAEA
Horse Paintings by Elin Pendleton
Animal paintings by Elin Pendleton, AAEA
Figurative paintings by Elin Pendleton, AAEA
Still life paintings by Elin Pendleton,AAEA
Landscape paintings by Elin Pendleton, AAAEA
One Painting Each Day
Elin Pendleton's Painting Instructional Videos
Elin Pendleton's Instrucitonal Books on Painting
Thoughts for Students
for Collectors
About the Elin Pendleton, Artist

Search Elin's Site
(opens a new page)

Verified Seller

The Daily Paintings
Archives:

2010
january
February
march
April
May
June

2009
january
February
march
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

2008
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

2007
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

2006
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

2005
Most are now on iTunes, with expanded audio commentary.(Opens new page)
Oct
Nov
Dec

Updated 3/29/12

The Daily Paintings and Postcard-Sized Sketches in Oils and Acrylics

Subscribe to Elin's "Daily Paintings" and receive every beautiful painting or lesson in your email through Googlegroups.

Click HERE to Subscribe

To the Archives to see the paintings by month and year

Prices as noted if available.

RSS Feeds available through Google Reader or other subscription service.

April 2010

8 Continuing to cover the canvas, I've pulled in the lighter greens of the distant grasses and the shadows on the roadbed of the bridge. This is a crucial point in the painting, because up to this point, I have COMPLETELY stayed in the cool box color family. The harmony of the painting is palpable, and I am happy with it at this point.

I'm going to move to the warm family of colors to finish this painting--having the sunlight come onto the figure that will appear on the bridge (I've already finished this painting, and the blog posting is going to automatically come out tomorrow.). These details and "punch" are withheld until I know the rest of the painting will stand on its strength of design and harmony. In my work, this is the essence of how I create my finished work. I realize many artists paint the "most important" stuff first... I like to make sure the supporting players "play well together" before adding the icing on the painting's cake.

In other news, I have a new flock of sheep doing the weeding around Two Trees these days. I own three, and four are "guests" while the weed abatement proceeds. They are fun to watch; it is as though wildlife goes by the windows as they move in unison across the hillside out the back door. This morning I watched a coyote barking just outside the fence--not a threat, since Seiko (the "watch" dog) is on duty, guarding her charges. Here's an image of the "gang" by the back patio. Oh boy! More ideas for paintings!
9 Did you notice the similarity of colors and temperature between the photo of the sheep yesterday and the painting at that point? The painting in its cool box family colors MATCHES the overcast day of the sheep photograph with uncanny accuracy--pointing out yet again the validity of the Color System! I find myself in awe of it, and how well and easily it works for these overcast days. (As well as other distinct times of day!)

But now the painting has come to a completed state (for a plein air piece, which of necessity cannot have too much busy details). The figure is painted, with the cadmium red in the sunlight and the alizarin (cool red) in the shadow of the hat and shirt. The sunlit areas of the roadbed are in, and show stark contrast to the cool shadows of the earlier state of the road. Yes, there is some thalo blue in that sunlit mix!
I enjoyed painting the "blips" of light between the cement staunchions of the bridge on this near side, earmarking and defining those shapes.

The sunlight (warm family) areas of this painting are primarily hovering around the figure--found in the tree on the left, the spotty sunshine on the bridge, and the sun-kissed area of the figure. "Easy-peasey" as a friend of mine would say!

I'm moving forward on the trip back east, making arrangements for critter care and airport delivery, packing a box or two of supplies for the trip, and getting excited about teaching THREE FULL WEEKS of COLOR BOOT CAMPs! Yippee!!

Here's yet another picture of the sheep doing their work. Three of the ewes shyly come up to me for treats now, and I can lead them in new directions with a little grain in a bucket. I have bells on two of them, and I can hear them as they herd moves around the property. Not hardly as headstrong as Vincent van Goat and Heather-Not-The-Momma goat... sheep are fun!!
18 Did I mention that I was going to burn about one third of my body of work? Over 220 paintings went into a bonfire last week, and it was cleansing and freeing. I've been sorting through the work I have created over the last three decades, and decided it was time to cull the ones I wouldn't want around to be examples of my legacy.

Was it hard to do? Yes, and yet no. Seeing and evaluating each work on an individual basis was like going back in time... remembering the places I've been, the events surrounding each of the paintings. In that regard, it was hard. But for the quality of the work, it was easy. After all, who is going to know or care what I felt or thought while I painted that garbage piece? Most collectors only want the best works, and they want to know the back story on those paintings alone. The angst I felt when I struggled through (and never completed) poorly designed and poorly executed paintings is of no importance to anyone except me, and YOU. You? Yes, because everyone wants to know that even the good artists have cr*ppy paintings.

The image above is a 12 x 16 reworked from that pile of bonfire paintings. I demonstrated how to fix a lousy painting during the Fallbrook workshop yesterday, by painting over it using the Color System to change it from almost evening light to DEFINITELY evening light. This is now a survivor of the bonfire.
30 I'm here on the East Coast for the next three weeks, teaching the workshop of Color Boot Camp returnees/repeat offenders (AKA "The Sisterhood of the Traveling Paints"). They have had almost five full days of rejuvenation, reflecting and reinforcement of the Color System, tempered with the laughter and shenanigans that only these "repeat offenders" can produce. I'm painting with them, but not in so much of demonstration mode but more to expand on topics already covered in the computer lectures and specific training for each boot camper's needs.

So I started this morning light 12 x 12 acrylic from Kentucky Horse Park source material, knowing that the deadline for the AAEA (American Academy of Equine Art) fall show is approaching.

There is so much to see and do here on the farm--over 700 acres of woods, pasture...and a new foal! I've already started an oil from one of my reference photos!

Georgia at this time of year is gorgeous, both in weather and in the warmth of the folks who call it home. I love coming here, and will be taking next week to teach the Florida group, then back to the farm here to introduce new "CBC recruits" to the Color System for Artists. There might be one spot left. I know the Florida group next week in Ocala has almost filled, too!

What a glorious life of an artist!!