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Updated 3/29/12

The Daily Paintings and Postcard-Sized Sketches in Oils and Acrylics

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February 2010

6 Compare this image with my last posting, and you'll se some VERY important changes, but those changes might not even be noticeable at first glance. That's the beauty of the artist's eye--the subtleties that we are aware of because of our training, years of comparing and contrasting what we want versus what is already on that flat surface. The changes just HAD to be done. I still think this one should have gotten into the Art Show at the Dog Show, but when they are "show" people, perhaps they ahve a different outlook on dogs in general My paintings of the shelter cast offs didn't receive merit there, however YOUR response to that series made my day. So art shows are one good venue for exposure, but ought not be the end-all-be-all for measuring one's artistic competence.

I
7 Called "Exploring", this 12 x 16 acrylic was started last year at a demonstration and talk for the Hemet Valley Art Association. I finished it up today, and will be taking the original to the demonstration next Wednesday. I just love working with the thin veils of color, developing interesting passages within larger values and hues. It takes time, but I have time right now. I especailly love the blues on the shadowed sides of the black and white kids.

Bringing a painting to a finished state is a sort of dance with what's going on in front of me coupled with the knowledge in my head. Choices are made for color, brush marks and areas to develop based upon that partnership. Oh, and listening to a good audio book doesn't hurt!

I did make time today to go with a great bunch of folks hiking on Sunday morning, and we all went out for brunch afterward. In the image below, I'm the one midway down the table next to the fellow in the black cap. Keeping excess pounds off is part of the strength I am finding, and I take great pleasure in being able to do many things at this point in my life. Being in good condition is a gift one gives oneself--no one else can do that for you!


Thanks to those of you who wrote yesterday, I know...however it is good to know there are others with this section on the road of experience behind them! Going out with folks helps, you betcha.
10 Today I had the pleasure of going back to Hemet and meeting 80 people who had come out to see my demonstration in oils. It was a wonderful afternoon, and everyone seemed to have a good time watching me paint and chatter along about how I do these images. I didn't quite finish the painting, but did photograph it in stages as I painted it. So here's the first step. This is a 16 x 20 canvas panel, and comes from source material I took while at the Kentucky Horse Park several years ago. This is the initial drawing of the polo ponies tied and resting beside their trailer, and shows the essential design. The canvas has been toned with a warm "peachy" middle value, and I draw the essential shadow shapes as well, so that the whole design is cohesive and shows the structure. The drawing is done with a brush filled with burnt umber thinned to an ink-like consistency.

11 Here's the 16 x 20 oil demonstration for the Hemet Valley Art Association after about 10 minutes with the brush on the canvas. I'm completely in the Cool Box of the Color System for these lower values, all representing shadows in the composition. I like to start with darks, painting UP to the light as I work.

Most interesting at this stage is the "warm" reflected light on the belly of the third horse--a gray. That's a "peach" color made by white, alizarin and yellow ocrhe. Great illusion of warm where it is needed. I do admit that the luscious blue-green of the Thalo green and white mix in those shadows gives me shivers of excitement, though! More tomorrow, and I hope you're enjoying the development of this one as much as I am.

I am not interested in edges or tight control, but more in the masses of value. Like good construction, one ensures that the walls are sturdy before putting in the windows!
12 It is really coming together now with the start and the addition of the warm box palette in those grassy sunlit areas! The Color System works so well, because it was just an easy switch of the boxes to get to this point, and you can see how the dynamics of adding the warms makes the painting read right.

The colors in the grasses are not pure by any means, but are from the warm box, with the dominant pigments being sap green, cad yellow and cad orange. Can you feel the heat there? It contrasts so beautifully with the blue-green shadows laid in yesterday. Again, no edges worrying me at this point, just the big shapes.

A good weekend ahead, with fun, painting and laughter. I hope yours will be as much fun.

14 In looking at the difference between this and my last posting, the changes may not be that large. I am working on the horse trailer and the grasses, bring them subtly up in details which will support the details yet to come on the horses. I know that these small endeavors are necessary so that when I work on the horses, they will end up surpassing the details I put in now.